The Folk-Speech of Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent

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Colecciones : SC. 1800-1950
Fecha de publicación : 1869
[EN] Traditional Short Stories and Poems mainly in the Cumberland and Westmoreland Dialects.
[ES] Historias Cortas y poemas tradicionales en los dialectos de Cumberland y Westmoreland.
Publicado el : viernes, 24 de agosto de 2012
Lectura(s) : 118
Fuente : Gredos de la universidad de salamenca
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Número de páginas: 158
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The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)


Author: Alexander Craig Gibson (1813-1874)
Text type: Prose & Verse
Date of composition: 1869
Editions: 1869, 1873, 1880, 1891, 2007
Source text:
Craig Gibson, Alexander. 1869. The Folk-Speech of Cumberland and
Some Districts Adjacent; Being Short Stories and Rhymes in the
Dialects of the West Border Counties. London: John Russel Smith.
e-text:
Access and transcription: July 2011
Number of words: 41,390
Dialect represented: Cumberland
Produced by Pilar Sánchez-García

Copyright © 2011– DING, The Salamanca Corpus, Universidad de Salamanca



Craig Gibson, Alexander (1813-1874)
The Folk-Speech of Cumberland and Some
Districts Adjacent (1869)


THE FOLK- SPEECH OF CUMBERLAND
AND SOME DISTRICTS ADJACENT;

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

BEING
SHORT STORIES AND RHYMES
IN THE DIALECTS OF THE WEST
BORDER COUNTIES
BY
ALEXANDER CRAIG GIBSON; F.S.A.

What hempen Home-spuns have we swaggering here.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
Speech, manners, morals, all without disguise.
The Excursion.

LONDON: JOHN RUSSELL SMITH;
CARLISLE: GEO. COWARD.
MDCCCLXIX

TO
WILLIAM DICKINSON,
OF NORTH MOSSES AND THORNCROFT,
F.L.S.,
Author of “A Glossary of Cumberland Words and Phrases,”
“Lamplugh Club,” “A Prize Essay on the Agriculture of West
Cumberland,” “The Botany of Cumberland,” &c., &c., &c.,

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

THIS VOLUME IS INSCRIBED,
IN CORDIAL AND SKILL DISPLAYED IN HIS ELUCIDATIONS
OF THE HOMELY SPEECH
OF OUR NATIVE COUNTY, AND IN GRATEFUL
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF THE UNFAILING SYMPATHY
AND THE KINDLY HELP WITH WHICH HE
HAS BRIGHTENED A FRIENDSHIP
OF MANY YEARS.
[iv]

PREFACE.

One or two of the Cumberland stories included in this
volume,aswellassomeofthepiecesinrhyme,havealreadybeen
circulatedverylargelyinnewspapers,pamphlets,andcollections.
Their reappearance, along with many hitherto unpublished
additions,inthisaggregatedform,isduemainlytothepopularity
attainedbythemseparately.Whethertheymaybeasarin
this more pretentious guise as in their humbler, and perhaps,
moreappropriateform,remainstobetried.
Iclaimsuperiorityovermostoftheearlierworkersinthe
samephilologicalgroundinrespectofthegreaterpurityofmy
dialect. The Cumberland speech as written herein is pure
Cumbrian,asthespeechoftheScottishpieces,introducedfor
variety’s sake, is pure Scotch. Miss Blamire, Stagg, Anderson,
Rayson,

[v]
andothers,haveallwrittentheirdialectpieces,moreorless,in
theScoto-Cumbrianwhichprevailsalongthesouthernsideofthe
westBorder.Inotherrespectsmyinferioritytothosedeservedly
popularwritersissufficientlyevident.But,asexpositionsofthe

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

folk-speechofthosepartsoftheCountywhere,andwhereonly,
the unadulterated old Norse-rooted Cumbrian vernacular is
spoken, I claim for these Tales and Rhymes the distinction of
surpassing all similar productions, excepting only the dialect
writingsofmyfriendMr.Dickinson,andperhapstheBorrowdale
Letter ofIsaacRitson,andtheGwordieandWillofCharlesGraham.
Ishouldnotomittostate,however,thatMr.JohnChristianof
London,andawriterwhoassumedthenom de plumeofJackTodd,
haveevincedintheircontributionstothelocalpress,amastery
overthedialectofWhitehavenanditsvicinitywhichmakesus
wishthattheirpenshadbeenmoreprolific.
FortheillustrationsIhaveattemptedofthespeechofHigh
FurnessanditsWestmorlandborder,Iasknosuchdistinction.
The dialect there, as in the adjacent parts of Cumberland, is
vitiatedbyanintermixtureofthatoftheCountyPalatine,ofwhich
Furnessformsaportion;andasitisspoken,so,if

[vi]

writtenatall,shoulditbewritten.Theseappearhereforthe
reasonalreadyassignedfortheintroductionoftheRhymesgiven
inthedialectofDumfriesshire.
The work rests its claims to favourable consideration
entirelyonitsvalueasafaithfullyrenderedcontributiontothe
dialectliteratureofthecountry.Nohigherestimateissoughtfor
it.Theproductionofitsvariouscontentshasbeenanoccasional
amusementindulgedinduringsomeoftheintervalsofleisureand
repose afforded by pursuits of a more important, more
engrossing,anditishoped,amoreusefulcharacter,withwhich,
haditinanywiseinterfered,ithadnotbeenproceededwith.Its
compositionhasbeenarelaxationnotatask;adivertisement,not
anoccupation;andhaditssuccesswhenpublishedbeendeemed
incompatiblewiththeseconditions,ithadnotappeared.

BEBINGTON
th December18 ,1868

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)


[vii]
CONTENTS
Page
JoeandtheGeologist (Cumberland) 1
T’Reetson’t (Ibid) 7
BobbyBank’sBodderment (Ibid) 17
WiseWiff (Ibid) 27
LalDinahGrayson (Ibid) 37
Jwohnny,Gitoot! (Ibid) 40
TheRunawayWedding (Ibid) 43
BillyWatson’Lonning (Ibid) 46
LoneandWeary (Ibid) 50
T’CleanNedo’Kes’ick (Ibid) 53
BenWells (Ibid) 57
SannterBella (Ibid) 60
BranthetNeùkBoggle (Ibid) 63
MaryRayandMe (Ibid) 73
[viii]
TheBannasydeCairns (HighFurness) 76
BettyYewdale (Ibid) 82
TheSkullsofCalgarth (Westmorland) 89
Māp’ment (HighFurness) 101
OxenfellDobby (Ibid) 104
MeenieBell (Dumfriesshire) 113
ALockerbyeLyck (OldScotch.) 116
TheFarmers’Wiveso’Annandale (Dumfriesshire) 128
AReminiscenceofCorrie (Ibid) 131
ReminiscencesofLockerbie (Ibid) 143
Yano’t’Elect (Cumberland) 151
KeàtieCurbison’sCat (Ibid) 157
JosephThompson’sThumb (Ibid) 160
CurstyBenn (Ibid) 168
TomRailton’sWhiteSpats (Ibid) 172

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

ASneckPossett (Ibid) 180
RemarksontheCumberlandDialect 183
Glossary 189


[1]
JOEANDTHEGEOLOGIST

Yahetfoorneun,whenwewaroa’gailythrangatheàm,anoald
gentlemanmak’ofafellowcom’intulooarfoaldan’said,whyte
natural,‘athewantitsomebodytogàwidhimon’tfells.Weoa’
stoptan’teukagudleukathimafooranybodyspak;atlastfadder
said,middlin’sharp-like–(heola’sspeaksthatwaywhenwe‘re
owtesathrang,doesfadder)–“We‘vesummatelsetodeuhere
nortogàrakinowert’fellsivafinedaylikethis,widnèabodykens
whoa.”T’gentlemanwasaqueerishlikeoaldchap,widasharp
leukoot,greyhairandasmo’feàce–dristi’black,widawhite
neckclothlikeaparson,an’aparofspecksont’topofagaylang
nwoseatwasn’tsetvarrafairatweent’e’enonhim,sooa‘atwhen
heleuk’t

[2]

ebbematyanthroughhisspecksherayderturn’thisfeàcetot’ya
side.Heleuk’tthatwayatfadder,gevalalchèarfulbitofalaugh
an’said,ivhisoanmak’o’toke,‘athedudn’twanttohinderwark,
buthewadgiveanybody‘atken’tt’fellsweel,amattero’five
shillin’togàwidhim,an’carrytwolālbags.“’Howaywidtha,Joe,”
sezfaddertome,“it’sacroonmairnoriverthouwaswūrthat
heàm!”Imeàdnèawordsabootit,butgatme-sel’agudlūmpofa
stick,an’awayweset,t’oaldlangnwos’tmanan’me,ebbemupt’
deal.
Aswewar’climmin’t’fellbreist,hegehmetwoemptybags
tocarry,meàdo’ledder.ThinksItome-sel’,“I’sgāntoeddleme
fiveshillin’middlin’cannily.”Iniverthowtehewadfinndowteon
t’fellstofullhislalbagswid,butIwasmisteàn!

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

Heturn’toottobeafarlisheroaldchapnorabodywadha’
thowte,toleukathisgrayhairandhiswhitehankecheran’his
specks. He went lowpin owre wet spots an’ gūrt steàns, an’
scrafflinacrosscraggsan’screes,tulyanwadha’swornhewas
sūmmatakintulaHerdwicktip.
Efterawhilehebegonleukin’hardatoa’tsteànsan’craggs
wecom’at,an’thanheteuktillbreckan

[3]

lūmpsoffthemwidaqueerlalhammerhehedwidhim,an'stuffin
t'bitsintilt'bags'athegehmetocarry.Hefairlycap'tmenoo.I
dudn'tkenwhattomako'secacustomerast'is!AtlastIcudn't
helpaxinhimwhatmeàdhimcumsèafarupont'felltolaitbitso'
steànswhenhemay’dfinndsèamanydooni'tdeàls?Helaugh'ta
gaybit,an’thanwentonknappin’awaywidhislalhammer,an’
saidhewasajollyjist.ThinksItome-sel,thou’sajollyjackass,but
itmaksnèamattertomeifthouno'butpaysmet'fiveshillin’thou
promish’tma.
Varraweel,hekeep’tonatthisfecklesswarktulgailyleàtat
oni’tefter-neun,an’bethattimeo’dayhe’dpang’tbeàtho’t
ledderpwokesasfullastheywadhodwidbitso’steàn.
I’venitsèaoffenhedaharderdarrakeftert'sheep,owther
atclippintimeorsoavintime,asIhedfollowin’thatoaldgrey
heiditchapan’carryin’hisledderbags.Buthooiver,wegatback
tuloorhouseafoorneeght.Mūddergevt’oaldjollyjist,asheco’t
his-sel’,somebreidan'milk,an'efterhe'dteànthatan'toak'talal
bitwidfadderabootsheepfarmingan’seclike,hepaitmamefive
shillin’likeaman,an’thantel'tmahewadgi'maūdderfive
shillin’ifIwad

[4]
bringhispwokesfullo'steànsdoontoSkeàl-hillbenineo'clocki't
mwornin'.
HesetofftowoaktoSkeàl-hilljustasitwasgrowin'dark;an'
neistmwornin',asseunasI'dgittenmepoddish,Iteukt'seàm

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

rwoadwidhisledderbagsowermeshoolder,thinkin'tulme-sel
'atyanmay'dmakalalfortuneooto'thūrjollyjistsifalockmair
onthemwadno'butcomeoorway.
,Itwasanūdderhetmwornin,an'Ihedn'twoak'tfartillI
begontothinkthatIwasasgūrtafeulast'oaldjollyjisttocarry
brockensteànso'twaytoSkeàl-hill,whenImay'dfinndplentyiv
anyrwoadside,clwosetot'spotIwastackin'themtul.SooaI
shack'tthemooto't'pwokes,an'thensteptonagaybitleeter
widoutthem.
WhenIcomnārtoSkeàl-hill,IfūndoaldAberramAtchisson
sittinonasteulbreckansteànstomendrwoadswid,an'Iax'thim
ifImedfullmyledderpwokesfraehisheap.Aberramwasvarra
kaim't'an'tell'tmatotakthem'atwasn'tbrockenifIwantit
steàns,sooaItell'thimhooitwasan'oa'abootit.T'oaldmaizlin
wasliketotoytleofhissteulwid

[5]

laughin',an'saidmemūddersudtakgudcareonma,forIwas
owersharpachaptoleevevarralangi'thiswarld;butI'dbetter
fullmypwokesasIliked,an'mak'onwidthem.
T'jollyjisthedjustgittenhisbreakfastwhenIgattoSkeàl-
hill,an'theyteukmaintilt'parlourtulhim.Hegūrnedoa'tfeàce
owerwhenIwentinwidhisbags,an'tell'tmetosetthemdoonin
aneuk,an'thanax'tmaifIwadhevsomebreakfast.IsaidI'd
gittenmepoddish,butIdudn'tmind;sooahetell'tthemtobring
insomemaircoffee,an'eggs,an'ham,an'twoastitbreidan'stuff,
an'IgatsecabreakfastasIneverseedi'mytime,whilet’oald
gentlemanwasgittin'his-sel'rūddytogangoffinacarriage'at
waswaitin'att'dooarforhim.
Whenhecomdoonstairshegehmet'udderfiveshillin'an'
paitformybreakfastan'whathe'dgittenhis-sel.Thanhetell'tma
toputt'ledderbagswidt'steànsinthemonbesidet’driver'sfeet,
an'inhegat,an'laugh'tan'noddit,an'awayhewent.
Iniverowderseednorheardmairoft'oaldjollyjist,butI've
offenthowtethermunbeparlishfew

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)


[6]

steànsi'hiscountry,whenhewassooapleas'tatgittin'twolāl
ledderbagsfullfortenshilling’,an’secabreakfastasthatan'.It
wadbeafaymishjobiffaddercouldsello't'steànsivoorfellat
fiveshillin'apwokeful—wadn'tit?

[7]
T'REETSON’T;
BEING
AnotherSupplementto“JoeandtheGeologist.”*
BYJOEHIS-SEL’.
THATTommyTowman'sameàstseriousleear—an',likeo'leears,
he'sadesper'tfeùl.Byjing!ifIhedadoghoafasdaftIwadhang't,
thatwadI!HegitsdoonabootCockerm'uthan'Wūrki'ton,noo's
an'than's;an'sūmgentlementheear,theytak'himintat'Globeor
t'GreenDraggin,an’jūstfornowteato'elsebutacoasetheythink
hekensme,theyfeedhimwiddrinkan'theyhodhimi'toaktillhe
canhardlytellwhedderendonhim'sup-bank;an'thantheydro'
himontotellthemo'mak's
*"AsupplementtoJoeandtheGeologist,byanotherhand,"appearedsome
time ago, in the Whitehaven Herald, and was afterwards published as a
pamphlet.Joe,consideringhimselfmisrepresentedinthatproduction,ableas
itwas,wishestoputhimselfright.Hencehisre-appearancebeforehismany
partialandindulgentfriends.

[8]
o’teàls—o'mak'sbuttruean's—abootme;an’t’pooarlālgowk
hesn'tgumptionaneuftosee'atthey'reno'butmakin'ghemon
him.But,loavin'surs!ifhe'dhedt'senseofagūrsegā'ngezlinhe
wadniverha'browteootsecalaftero'leesashe'sgittenyano'
themWūrki'tongentlemen(yan'atken'sweelhootowritedoon
oorheàmlytoke)toputintaprent;an'whatmak'syanmadder

The Salamanca Corpus: The Folk Speech of
Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent (1869)

noro't'rest,—toputthemi'prentjūstasifI'dtel'tthemme-sel’.
I'snūtt'chaptotrytocumoweranoaldjollyjistwidwhinin'oot
"Fadder'sdeid!"wheniverybodykens'atfadder'swhickernor
meàstonus.Mysarty!he'snino't'deein'mak'isn'tfadder.Wes'
hevtowūrryfadderwhenhistimecūms,forhe'llniverdeeofhis-
sel'salangasther'sanywarktohoondyanontull.An'Ineedn't
tellanybody'atknowsme,'atIwasnivert'chaptotak'inowdera
jollyjistoranyudderfeùl;an'ifIwas,I'snūtalikelyfellowtobe
freeten'tforwhatI'ddone.Butther'sm'appensūm'atdoesn't;an'
mebbee ther's a lock 'at doesn't know what a leear Tommy
Towmanis,an'sooa,beet'wayo'settin'me-sel'reetwidbeath
maks,I'lltellyéwhatdūdgāforret'atweenmean't'jollyjistt’
seckinttimehecomtulSkeàl-hill.

[9]

Isaidafooar'atI'dniverseenmairo't'oaldjollyjist,an'
whenIsaidthat,Ihedn't;butyādonkyneetlastsummerfadder
hedbeendoonLortonway,an''twasgailyleàtwhenhegatheàm.
Ashewassittin'ivhisoànsideo't'fire,tryin'tolowset'buttons
ofhisspats,hesaystome,"Joe,"sayshe,"Ico'tatSkeàl-hilli'my
rwoadheàm."Mudderwassittin'knittin'varrafastathūrsideo't'
hārth;shehedn'toppen'thermoothsenfadderco'heàm,—nay,
shehedn'tsamūchasleuk'tathimeftert'yahardglowre'atshe
gevhimatt'fūrst;butwhenhesaidhe'dbeenatSkeàl-hill,she
gevagrunt,an'said,asifshespaktillnèabodybuthur-sel',"Ey!a
blinndbodymedseethat.""Iwasspeakin'tillJoe,"saysfadder."
Joe,"sayshe,"IwasatSkeàl-hill"—anuddergrunt—"an'theytel't
me'atthyoaldfrindt'jollyjist'sbackageàn—Ithinkthu'dbetter
slipdoonan'seeifhewantstobuyanymairbrockensteàns;oald
AberramhasafineheaportwoligginasideKirgat.An',noo,'at
I'vegittenthemspatsoff,I’sawaytomybed."Muddertoka
partin'shotathimashestacker'toff.Shesaid,"Itwadbeasweel
forsūmonusifyéwadbidetheear,ifyémeantocarryoni't'way
ye'reshappin'!"Noo,thiswashardlyfairo'mudder,for

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